Articles

Capital letters: avoid these 3 common errors
13 November 2020

Capital letters: avoid these 3 common errors

Misuse of capital letters may not only be grammatically incorrect but could make your meaning unclear. Too many initial capitals can also be distracting for the reader and make your writing appear amateurish. Using initial capital letters correctly will increase readability and enhance your personal and professional credibility.

Using apostrophes to show possession
19 October 2020

Using apostrophes to show possession

When do we need to use apostrophes and why does the apostrophe sometimes come after the ‘s’ and sometimes before it? Using apostrophes to show possession or ownership is essential in written English to clarify meaning. All possessives, except for the word ‘its’, need an apostrophe and an ‘s’  at the end. Sometimes the concept of ownership is easy to work out; at other times it’s not so straightforward. 

Report writing training: 7 warning signs managers can't afford to ignore
27 September 2020

Report writing training: 7 warning signs managers can't afford to ignore

Unfortunately, our school system and many university degrees don't prepare students for writing at work. Many people are unaware their reports are unclear, unless the report's weaknesses are pointed out to them by a manager. Find out 7 of the most common report writing pitfalls that can be avoided through report writing training. 

Is it time to bring back the fountain pen?
28 August 2020

Is it time to bring back the fountain pen?

If you’re working from home during this pandemic, you might be feeling as though you’re living inside your computer. But it’s not just nostalgia and technology overload that’s making me hark back to the fountain pen and redisover the benefits of some endangered work practices.

Peeling the onion: a 3-step revision process
16 August 2020

Peeling the onion: a 3-step revision process

The first draft of any communication you write is likely to be wordier than it needs to be. There will be ambiguity. There will also be typos and inconsistencies. This is normal. Even professional writers need to go back and refine their work multiple times to make it clear and concise. Find out how our systematic, 3-stage approach will increase efficiency and achieve a better result.

When do too many cooks spoil the writing broth?
24 July 2020

When do too many cooks spoil the writing broth?

Writing is often seen as a solitary task. Yet to produce a report, brochure, fact sheet or other workplace communication, you’ll need to involve others. Having different team members contribute ideas as well as provide feedback on drafts can strengthen your communication. But beware. Too many cooks can sometimes spoil the writing broth leading to time consuming, costly and embarrassing outcomes.

How to dramatically increase readability using signposts
29 June 2020

How to dramatically increase readability using signposts

Enticing your reader to begin reading your report may be the biggest writing challenge you face. Even the most motivated reader is likely to be deterred by a report with pages of unbroken text. So how do you overcome this common barrier?

Online training: gimmicky tool or genuine learning?
15 May 2020

Online training: gimmicky tool or genuine learning?

Concise Writing Consultancy has been offering remote learning for the past 10 years through individual mentoring and coaching. As a result of COVID-19, we have significantly extended our online training options which will become permanent fixtures of our training offerings.

Get that promotion: 3 essential report writing strategies
8 May 2020

Get that promotion: 3 essential report writing strategies

A stumbling block for many team members wanting to progress into management positions is their writing ability. Poorly structured and unclear reports are major culprits that let many applicants down. Even if writing is not your strong point, here are 3 simple strategies to help you get a step closer to that promotion.

Chameleon words: alternative versus alternate
1 May 2020

Chameleon words: alternative versus alternate

English is a wonderfully flexible language. We borrow words from other languages, like 'ballet', 'chocolate' and 'patio', and make up words, like 'hangry' and 'mansplain'. Words go in and out of fashion, others disappear only to reappear again decades later. Other words, like 'alternate' can mean different things to different people.